Recent Posts

Should I Shake Hands or Bow?

By Derek On September 12, 2011


“Don’t gamble! Take all your savings and buy some good stock and hold it ‘till it goes up, then sell it. If it don’t go up, don’t buy it.” Will Rogers

When meeting clients it is critical to make a good first impression. The best way to do this is to be polite and mindful of etiquette. This extends from how and when to shake hands to business card usage. In fact, because it is important there is another post just dedicated to proper business card etiquette here.

No Dead Fish, Please

I live and work in Asia. I used to work in New York (“Wall Street”). In the US, when meeting a client you exchange business cards and give a firm handshake looking the person directly in the eye. To look away or give the limp, “dead fish” handshake implies lack of confidence or worse yet, shiftiness. Every time I

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Business Cards – I am Not a Barbarian

By Derek On September 12, 2011


Business Cards – I am Not a Barbarian

Never make forecasts, especially about the future.” Samuel Goldwin

Your business card may seem like a minor detail but it is actually quite important and you must always carry them on your person. The worst thing is to have a meeting with a new client, or clients and run out of business cards. You look like a dork. Clients need to know where you work, your position there and contact details. All this should be obvious.

When In Asia

If you work in Asia, or visit Asia on business, then your business card – and the etiquette associated with it – takes on even greater importance. Asian cultures, whether Japanese, Korean or Chinese are hierarchical and your position, or rank, within the company or society is very important. In most Asian languages there are even different verb forms and words used in everyday speech when talking

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Your First Bonus – What to Expect

By Derek On September 8, 2011


“If you don’t follow the stock market, you are missing some amazing drama.” Mark Cuban

As I have said in other posts, you should look at your first year in finance as a golden opportunity. It is an opportunity for you to learn not to earn. To be frank, in your first year you are basically a burden and wasting other people’s time. You are tolerated, and paid a pittance because of hope (“expectation” is too strong a word). It is “hoped” you will make a contribution to the team eventually.

If you are given a bonus at all consider yourself lucky. Your bonus will be tiny and more of a token bonus than anything else. Be thankful and say so. Don’t be shy. Your boss will pull you aside into a small, usually windowless room, and push a piece of paper across the table toward you. Typed on it will be

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